Obesity a bigger problem than world hunger, Lancet study says

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/obesity-a-bigger-problem-than-world-hunger-lancet-study-says-20160317-gnlbwk.htmlGlobal overeating has become a bigger problem than world hunger with more people now obese than underweight, the biggest ever study of worldwide trends in body mass index has revealed.

And it’s only going to get worse, the research, published in British medical journal The Lancet on Friday, says.

Over the past 40 years, the rate of obesity has increased 2.6-fold and the number of obese people worldwide has blown out from 105 million in 1975 to 641 million in 2014, the study found. Nearly 13 per cent of the global population is now obese, compared with just over 9 per cent who are underweight.

“We have changed from a world in which underweight prevalence was more than double that of obesity, to one in which more people are obese than underweight,” senior study author Majid Ezzati, from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London, said.

On present trends the world will not meet the target of halting the rise in the prevalence of obesity at its 2010 level by 2025, Professor Ezzati said.

Men in East and Southeast Asian had the largest increase in BMI of any region over the past decade. Since 2005, their average BMI has risen by more than five per cent – twice the 2.5 per cent increase for men worldwide.

Globally, men are catching up to women in the obesity stakes, the research also reveals.

In 1975, women were twice as likely as men to be obese, with 6.4 per cent of women and 3.2 per cent of men recording a BMI of 30 or higher. But the figure for men has more than tripled to 10.8 per cent over the past 40 years, edging closer to the proportion of obese women, which more than doubled to 14.9 per cent.

In Australia, the average BMI is in the overweight range of 25-29.9 for both women (26.8) and men (27.5). A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered healthy.

On current trends 37 per cent of Australian women and 37.8 per cent of men will be obese by 2025, the study says.

Almost a fifth of the world’s obese adults and more than a quarter of the world’s severely obese people live in the six high-income countries of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Britain and the US. Of these, the US has the highest average BMI for both men (28.9) and women (28.7). Obesity a bigger problem than world hunger, Lancet study says

 

https://i2.wp.com/ourgreenearthstore.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/1466648698164.jpg?fit=620%2C348&ssl=1https://i2.wp.com/ourgreenearthstore.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/1466648698164.jpg?resize=85%2C55&ssl=1Vicky WellsHealthBMI,body mass index,global obesity,The Lancet obesity,UK sugar taxObesity a bigger problem than world hunger, Lancet study says Global overeating has become a bigger problem than world hunger with more people now obese than underweight, the biggest ever study of worldwide trends in body mass index has revealed.And it's only going to get worse, the research, published in...Earth friendly, green products